YSI - Economic History Graduate Webinar - Spring 2022

Online Economic History Seminars with EHES

January 2022 - July 2022

The Spring 2022 series of the Economic History Graduate Webinar

Webinar Series

Registration form

Description

We are launching the fifth edition of the YSI-EHES Economic History Graduate Webinar this Spring. As in previous editions, we provide a platform for young researchers to present their ongoing work and get feedback from senior scholars. The online format has made exchanges from people from different regions and research areas possible, offering early stage researchers an important venue in these times of disconnection. As social distancing remains a reality, so does connecting online to reach out to the community.

If you are interested to attend in the webinar series please register using this form. If you registered for one of the previous events, you do not need to register again. Registered participants will receive a zoom link 24h before the event.

We encourage all young scholars to also join the YSI community.

The programme goes as follows:

  • April 5. Philipp Erfurth, CUNY Graduate Center, Unequal Unification? Income Inequality and Unification in 19th Century Italy and Germany. Chair: Giacomo Gabbuti, Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies.

  • NEW DATE April 26. Jon Denton-Schneider, University of Michigan, Colonial Institutions, Marriage Markets, and HIV: Evidence from Mozambique. Chair: Felix Meier zu Selhausen, Wageningen University.

  • May 3. Tehreem Husain, UCL, Time-varying Relationship between Returns on Government and Railway Securities 1880-1913: An Empirical Analysis. Chair: Latika Chaudhary, Naval Postgraduate School.

  • May 17. Tancredi Buscemi, University of Perugia, Real wages in the Kingdom of Sicily (1540-1830). Chair: Mattia Fochesato, Bocconi University.

  • NEW DATE May 24. Kai Cheng, University of Birmingham, The Impact of the Environment on Urbanisation During the late Qing Dynasty. Chair: Pei Gao, Yale University.

  • May 31. Sofia Tsitou, University of Macedonia, The Implications of the Population Exchange between Greece and Turkey on Literacy and Employment Rates of the Native Population. Chair: Felipe Valencia Caicedo, University of British Columbia.

If you have any question or feedback, please email us at eh@youngscholarsinitiative.org. We will get in touch with you as soon as we can.

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The YSI graduate seminar in Economic history is a joint collaboration between Ester Treccani, Viktor Melain, Carla Salvo, Ana Catelén, Maxence Castiello, Xabier Garcia and Jordi Caum with support from The Young Scholars Initiative, from the Institute for New Economic Thinking in New York and the European Historical Economics Society (EHES). Organizational details are subject to change.

UPCOMING EVENTS

There are no upcoming events in this project.

PAST EVENTS

Online

26 Apr 2022

Webinar

Jon Denton-Schneider

Jon Denton-Schneider, PhD Candidate from the University of Michigan will present his paper Colonial Institutions, Marriage Markets, and HIV: Evidence from Mozambique. ABSTRACT:During the colonial period, several types of extractive institutions organized much of economic activity in Sub-Saharan Africa. Historians argued that two of them —one pushing men into circular migration and one restricting their mobility— had different effects on marriage markets with bride price but not on development. Specifically, young men in a migrant-sending institution could make bridewealth payments, narrowing the spousal age gaps that would later increase HIV risk. But much of their wages was captured by elders through inflated bride prices instead of being saved, limiting circular migration’s development potential. To compare these extractive regimes, I exploit the arbitrary border within Mozambique that separated the two institutions for a half-century (1893-1942). In the colonial era, spousal age gaps were smaller in the migrant-sending region, even after the border was erased and circular migration rates converged. Today, HIV prevalence is substantially lower in this area, likely due to narrower age gaps between partners, but development outcomes are similar. These results show how different forms of colonial extraction affect health and wealth in Africa, and that marriage markets are a channel through which historical events shape the present.

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Online

5 Apr 2022

Webinar

Philipp Erfurth

Philipp Erfurth, PhD Candidate from CUNY Graduate Center will present his paper Unequal Unification? Income Inequality and Unification in 19th Century Italy and Germany. ABSTRACT:This research provides a comprehensive study of the linkages between unification and related policy choices on income inequality by examining the cases of Italy and Germany in the context of 19th century unification. To conduct this analysis, the study puts forward estimates of income inequality for pre-unification German states using social tables, compiled using primary data, some of which have thus far been unexplored in economic research. The findings suggest that differences in inequality between regions were more pronounced in Italy than in Germany. In seeking explanations for these trends, the study explores linkages between institutional structures, governance frameworks and inequality, connecting the research on federalism within the literature on inequality extraction.

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Online

24 May 2022

Webinar

Kai Cheng

Kai Cheng, recently got his PhD from the University of Birmingham and will be presenting his paper The Impact of the Environment on Urbanisation During the late Qing Dynasty. ABSTRACT:In this paper we examine the relationship between environmental factors and urbanisation both theoretically and empirically. The aim is to provide additional inputs into the explanation for the Great Divergence. Compared with previous studies, we apply a rural-urban migration framework to the late Qing dynasty to establish a link between urbanisation and environmental factors.

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Online

3 May 2022

Webinar

Tehreem Husain

Tehreem Husain, PhD Candidate from University College London (UCL) will present her paper Time-varying Relationship between Returns on Government and Railway Securities 1880-1913: An Empirical Analysis. ABSTRACT:Investment guides and newspaper reports published during the first era of globalisation refer to ‘railway securities being more lucrative in the long-run’ and ‘all British stocks subject to the same controlling influences’ (Chadwicks’ Investment Circular, 1870; Lowenfeld, 1909). This paper examines the long-run equilibrium relationship between returns on railway and government securities, the top-most avenues of investment during 1880-1913 in 15 capital-rich and capital-poor countries. Specifically, I explore three research questions. First, what is the underlying relationship between railway and government securities? Second, what role does country heterogeneity play in influencing the relationship between the two asset classes in the long-run? Third, does the relationship show time-varying characteristics? Using Pooled Mean Group, FMOLS and DOLS techniques the paper takes into account possible structural breaks and finds a robust and stable relationship between the two. Interestingly, returns on the two securities exhibit a time-varying relationship, and investors exhibit ‘flight to quality’ behaviour during the Barings crisis of 1890.I contextualise these empirical methods with investment advice provided during 1880-1913 and find that UK investors were aware of correlation, co-movement and diversification. More importantly, investment advisers’ suggestions were consistent with the recommendations of modern portfolio theory. The article contributes to the wider literature on financial globalisation during 1880-1913 in two ways. First, using modern time series techniques it finds evidence of the application of principles of modern portfolio theory before it was formally introduced by Markowitz in 1952. Second, the paper sheds light on investment strategies across countries and across time. In this way, the article contributes to understanding risk management, security pricing and investors’ portfolio diversification strategies during the first era of globalisation.

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Online

17 May 2022

Webinar

Tancredi Buscemi

Tancredi Buscemi, PhD Candidate from University of Perugia will present his paper Real wages in the Kingdom of Sicily (1540-1830). ABSTRACT:Focusing on the Kingdom of Sicily, this study reassesses the debate on the Italian economic downturn and the Italian regional development. Tracking the early evidence on the Island in the first fifty years of the Kingdom of Italy (Federico, Nuvolari and Vasta, 2019), the findings challenge the common belief of Southern Italy as a homogenous backward area. Instead, results suggest more than one divide in pre-unitarian regions showing Sicilian living standards as structurally above the Italian average. The paper discusses crucial implications on traditional debates of pre-industrial Italy and poses new questions on the origins of its regional divide. Furthermore, it enhances the evidence of living standards on the Mediterranean sea.

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Online

31 May 2022

Webinar

Sofia Tsitou

Sofia Tsitou, researcher from University of Macedonia will present her paper The Implications of the Population Exchange between Greece and Turkey on Literacy and Employment Rates of the Native Population. ABSTRACT:This paper sheds lights on the implications of a major historical event, i.e., the population exchange between Greece and Turkey that was officially agreed in 1923, on the economy of Greece. We construct a very rich dataset from various historical and archival sources; we compile a dataset of 141 provinces for the periods 1920 and 1928. Besides the unique historical dataset, we also exploit this “natural experiment” to implement a differences-in-differences approach. Overall, ourfindings suggest that the presence of the refugee population has led to an increase in literacy population for both men and women. Concerning employment, we find that upon the arrival of refugees, the male native population turned away from agriculture to the industry, transportation, stock farming and trade sectors.

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Working groups
  • Economic History
Project Organizers
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Jordi Caum Julio

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Ester Treccani

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Xabier Garcia Fuente

For questions, the Project Organizers.

YSI Webinar

Kai Cheng

May 24 2022, 15:00

Kai Cheng, recently got his PhD from the University of Birmingham and will be presenting his paper The Impact of the Environment on Urbanisation During the late Qing Dynasty.

ABSTRACT:
In this paper we examine the relationship between environmental factors and urbanisation both theoretically and empirically. The aim is to provide additional inputs into the explanation for the Great Divergence. Compared with previous studies, we apply a rural-urban migration framework to the late Qing dynasty to establish a link between urbanisation and environmental factors.

Recording

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Time & Date

Start: May 24 2022, 15:00*

Duration: 60 minutes

*Time is displayed in your local time zone (Africa/Abidjan).

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Topic: Kai Cheng

Time: May 24 2022, 15:00 (Timezone: Africa/Abidjan)

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